containers
restaurant
containers
danger door
canoes
dark
table
hanger
dark stairway
boots
scooter
boat
taps
posters
on off
overpass
high scene
hammers
graffiti
antigua
file cabinet
dallas windows
streaming
potter
stairs
stool
joint
concrete
mini
cuba chairs
natchez
vaulted
falls
boats oxford
cactus
vw van
bannister
beach 1
hdr landscape
dripped paint
big hook
werthan
pharmacy
fall bench
flower
eye
sunglasses
tree
on strike
sinks
wires
cotton
stream
old sign
man blur
three slits
pipes
beach 2
propeller
woman on steps
resurrection
garage door
electrical
tubes
butterflies
conduit
warehouse
leafs
boats

David C. Baker: Author | Speaker | Advisor—Business Insight for the Expert Firm

Twitter Feed

@ReCourses

Blog

How Not To Act Like An Expert

I've been offering business insight to help experts achieve higher financial performance, manage people better, staff appropriately, and provide services that their clients value. In the last 20+ years of doing this, I've observed a few practices that contradict expertise. Here are some things that I notice experts doing that seem to contradict how they want us to see them.

  • Be Too Busy to Articulate Thought Leadership There are all sorts of reasons why experts don't write and speak, but none of them are legitimate. If you don't have the time, you aren't making enough money. If you don't know what to say, you aren't an expert. If you don't know how to say it, you haven't practiced enough. If you find too many audiences when directing your writing, you haven't focused enough. Aside from the content itself, having the time to write it sends just as powerful a message.
  • Be Immediately Accessible to the Client Whether misguided or not, developed cultures prefer that their experts be largely...
More >

You Have One Primary Job as a Leader

As a leader, your job is to make decisions. There are other things, too, but that is your main job.

Warring against that, possibly, is your fear of making the wrong decision. Rest assured in knowing that there is greater long-term potential harm in not making decisions than there is in making wrong decisions.

So to be an effective leader, try to master the timing of your decisions rather than the criteria for your decisions.

Key Times to Make Decisions

So, when should you make a decision? Here are the four most important times to make a decision:

  • When you see an opportunity you're small enough to pounce on. This is usually an opportunity that the big firm has to study, meet about, appoint a committee, assess the risks, get funding approval, and then build consensus around three times per week for five months. There are significant advantages around scale, but being nimble is not one of them.
  • When your people are...
More >

Blog

How Not To Act Like An Expert

I've been offering business insight to help experts achieve higher financial performance, manage people better, staff appropriately, and provide services that their clients value. In the last 20+ years of doing this, I've observed a few practices that contradict expertise. Here are some things that I notice experts doing that seem to contradict how they want us to see them.

  • Be Too Busy to Articulate Thought Leadership There are all sorts of reasons why experts don't write and speak, but none of them are legitimate. If you don't have the time, you aren't making enough money. If you don't know what to say, you aren't an expert. If you don't know how to say it, you haven't practiced enough. If you find too many audiences when directing your writing, you haven't focused enough. Aside from the content itself, having the time to write it sends just as powerful a message.
  • Be Immediately Accessible to the Client Whether misguided or not, developed cultures prefer that their experts be largely...
More >

You Have One Primary Job as a Leader

As a leader, your job is to make decisions. There are other things, too, but that is your main job.

Warring against that, possibly, is your fear of making the wrong decision. Rest assured in knowing that there is greater long-term potential harm in not making decisions than there is in making wrong decisions.

So to be an effective leader, try to master the timing of your decisions rather than the criteria for your decisions.

Key Times to Make Decisions

So, when should you make a decision? Here are the four most important times to make a decision:

  • When you see an opportunity you're small enough to pounce on. This is usually an opportunity that the big firm has to study, meet about, appoint a committee, assess the risks, get funding approval, and then build consensus around three times per week for five months. There are significant advantages around scale, but being nimble is not one of them.
  • When your people are...
More >

Speaking Events

Revenue 2.0: Emerging Models for Expert Firms

You’re in business to make money and you’ve got ideas on how that should be done (along with a track record of doing so.) If you’ll give us two days of your life we’ll help you replace those ideas with even better ones and offer a more lucrative path to higher revenue, profit, and fulfillment. It’s not that your ideas are bad—they’ve gotten you this far after all. It’s just that what got you here doesn’t usually get you to the next level of profit and wealth. Your initial model for success becomes the constraint to even better success.

Atlanta, in a brewery, September 8-9.

Rethinking the Employee Review

Webinar: How we got to the current state of the employee review is anyone's guess, but it doesn't work on many, many levels. Everyone--on both sides--dreads it. But there are some really interesting, really helpful ways to do employee reviews that both parties look forward to and which move the company and the employee's career forward. Come learn about some exciting ways to do employee reviews. $160


Blog

How Not To Act Like An Expert

I've been offering business insight to help experts achieve higher financial performance, manage people better, staff appropriately, and provide services that their clients value. In the last 20+ years of doing this, I've observed a few practices that contradict expertise. Here are some things that I notice experts doing that seem to contradict how they want us to see them.

  • Be Too Busy to Articulate Thought Leadership There are all sorts of reasons why experts don't write and speak, but none of them are legitimate. If you don't have the time, you aren't making enough money. If you don't know what to say, you aren't an expert. If you don't know how to say it, you haven't practiced enough. If you find too many audiences when directing your writing, you haven't focused enough. Aside from the content itself, having the time to write it sends just as powerful a message.
  • Be Immediately Accessible to the Client Whether misguided or not, developed cultures prefer that their experts be largely...

You Have One Primary Job as a Leader

As a leader, your job is to make decisions. There are other things, too, but that is your main job.

Warring against that, possibly, is your fear of making the wrong decision. Rest assured in knowing that there is greater long-term potential harm in not making decisions than there is in making wrong decisions.

So to be an effective leader, try to master the timing of your decisions rather than the criteria for your decisions.

Key Times to Make Decisions

So, when should you make a decision? Here are the four most important times to make a decision:

  • When you see an opportunity you're small enough to pounce on. This is usually an opportunity that the big firm has to study, meet about, appoint a committee, assess the risks, get funding approval, and then build consensus around three times per week for five months. There are significant advantages around scale, but being nimble is not one of them.
  • When your people are...

Books


David C. Baker: Author | Speaker | Advisor—Business Insight for the Expert Firm